Category Archives: Punishment culture

Why Prong Collars Hurt

Please see additional note at the bottom of the post. Prong collars, also called pinch collars, are metal chain collars for dogs that include links of prongs whose ends press into the dog’s neck. When a dog pulls on leash, … Continue reading

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Posted in Punishment, Punishment culture | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

World Dog Trainers’ Motivation Transparency Challenge

What should a dog trainer be willing and able to tell you about his or her techniques? And how valuable is it to get that information in clear, concrete language? Renowned dog trainer Jean Donaldson has put a lot of thought … Continue reading

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Posted in Critical Thinking, Dog training hints, Punishment culture, Training philosophy | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

It’s Not Painful. It’s Not Scary. It Just Gets the Dog’s Attention!

Some dog trainers who use tools such as shock, prong, or slip collars, or startle the dog with thrown objects or loud noises, claim that these things are done only to “get the dog’s attention.” They may further insist that the dog … Continue reading

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Posted in Cues, Human and dog misunderstandings, Operant conditioning, Punishment culture, Reinforcement, Terminology | Tagged , , , , | 40 Comments

Bark Busters: Promoting Facts or Myths?

A friend recently shared a flyer from Bark Busters, a dog training franchise business. It is called “Barking: The Facts” and can be seen at this link.  The flyer made me interested so I set out to investigate the methods … Continue reading

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Posted in Human and dog misunderstandings, Punishment, Punishment culture, Reactivity, Stress Signals | Tagged , , , , , , | 90 Comments

Haters

We interrupt this dog blog for a rant about rhetoric and civil discourse.  Here is why I plan never to call anyone a “hater” or refer to them as such. History: Haters Gonna Hate It’s a good bet that the … Continue reading

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Posted in Punishment culture, Terminology, Training philosophy | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

But I Want to Use All the Tools in the Tool Box!

Have you heard the one about the toolbox? This is the sixth in a series that details and rebuts fallacious arguments against force free training. Today’s erroneous argument is directly related to “But Every Dog is Different!” in that it … Continue reading

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Posted in Punishment, Punishment culture, Reinforcement, Training philosophy | Tagged , , , , , | 37 Comments

Force-Free Training and the Continuum Fallacy: Defining Ourselves

Although this post is about discussions and accusations about humane training, it doesn’t provide fodder for pithy sound bites or snappy answers. The whole point of it is why it can be difficult to explain succinctly our position as science-based, … Continue reading

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Posted in Examples for Teachers, Punishment culture, Shock Collars, Terminology, Training philosophy | Tagged , , | 43 Comments

But “Purely Positive” is a LIE!

This remark has been hurled at me. How about you? I certainly don’t call myself “purely positive” or particularly like the term. But here it comes at me, predictable as clockwork, anyway. The reason this keeps happening is in the … Continue reading

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Posted in Operant conditioning, Punishment, Punishment culture, Reinforcement, Training philosophy | Tagged , , , | 20 Comments

Crossing Over

I am a crossover trainer, and we tend to like to tell our stories. “Crossing over,” and “crossover trainer” refer to a trainer who switched from punishment based, or mixed training that included aversives, to training that is centered around … Continue reading

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Posted in Punishment, Punishment culture, Reinforcement, Training philosophy | Tagged , , | 3 Comments