Tag Archives: dog trainer’s responsibilities

Not All “Choices” Are Equal (Choice: Part 1)

Shout-outs to Companion Animal Psychology for the post, The Right to Walk Away” which covers the effects of offering that particular choice in animal experiments, and encourages us to apply the concept to our animals’ lives. Also to Yvette Van Veen for her … Continue reading

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Posted in Behavior Science, Choice, Operant conditioning, Training philosophy | Tagged , | 21 Comments

“Good Sit!”

Here is a quiz. Let’s say someone says, “Sit,” to a dog, intending the word as a cue. What part of speech is the word, “Sit”? Then, what part of speech is the same word if we say, “Good sit!” afterwards? That was … Continue reading

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Posted in Behavior Science, Cues, Dog Training | Tagged , | 27 Comments

The Humane Hierarchy, Part 2 of 2: Examples

This is the second of two posts on Susan Friedman’s Humane Hierarchy. Here is Humane Hierarchy Part 1 in case you missed it. In this part, I present examples of each of the methods listed in the Humane Hierarchy. My … Continue reading

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Posted in Behavior Science, Negative Reinforcement, Operant conditioning, Positive Reinforcement, Punishment, Reinforcement, Terminology, Training philosophy, Why Use Positive Reinforcement? | Tagged , , , | 10 Comments

The Humane Hierarchy, Part 1 of 2: Overview

I am a Humane Hierarchy trainer. That is the name of the roadmap I use to make ethical choices about the training methods I use. I’m going to describe the method in this post. (Humane Hierarchy Part 2, which is … Continue reading

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Posted in Behavior Science, Negative Reinforcement, Operant conditioning, Positive Reinforcement, Punishment, Reinforcement, Terminology, Training philosophy, Why Use Positive Reinforcement? | Tagged , , , | 47 Comments

Thank You Susan Friedman and Associates: A Personal Review of the BehaviorWorks Living and Learning with Animals Professional Course

Imagine if you could drop out of this world for two months and live somewhere where positive reinforcement ruled rather than punishment. Where teachers understood how people best learn. Where people taking a class were there to learn, not work … Continue reading

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Posted in Behavior Science, Review, Training philosophy | Tagged , , , , , , | 26 Comments

Letting the Treat Fit the Feat: Real World Application

One upon a time there was an adolescent dog in an open admission shelter who had one day left. And a woman who knew nothing about dog training, already had a smaller dog, and made an impulsive decision to go … Continue reading

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Posted in Dog Training, Reinforcement, Toys and Play, Training philosophy, Zen/Leave it | Tagged , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Let the Treat Fit the Feat

I am taking Susan Friedman’s Living and Learning with Animals professional online course. Woo hoo! It is incredible. My brain is so happy with all the new stuff I am feeding it. And the sense of community created by how … Continue reading

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Posted in Dog Training, Reinforcement, Toys and Play, Training philosophy | Tagged , | 9 Comments

Lumping It: A Public Service Announcement

So maybe you are new to clicker training and you keep hearing people talking about lumping and how bad it is. Be a splitter, not a lumper, they say. You have a vague idea about it but maybe aren’t exactly … Continue reading

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Posted in Dog Training, Generalization, Human and dog misunderstandings, Operant conditioning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 22 Comments

Fixing What I Broke

Part 2 of Dogs Notice Everything. The three “Missed Cue” videos were among the first videos I posted publicly wherein I tried to illuminate an aspect of dog training. Imagine my surprise when, after showing how Zani and Summer didn’t understand … Continue reading

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Posted in Cues, Dogs' perceptions, Generalization | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Dogs Notice Everything

I am fascinated by how dogs perceive the world. Dog experts and ethologists have been telling us for a while that dogs discriminate beautifully, but generalize poorly. What this means in our training lives is that dogs notice all the … Continue reading

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Posted in Cues, Dogs' perceptions, Generalization | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 24 Comments